Your Highness Bloopers

Your Highness

Cast: Natalie Portman, James Franco, Danny McBride, Zooey Deschanel, Justin Theroux, Toby Jones, Damian Lewis, Charles Dance, Brian Steele

Throughout history, tales of chivalry have burnished the legends of brave, handsome knights who rescue fair damsels, slay dragons and conquer evil. But behind many a hero is a good-for-nothing younger brother trying just to stay out of the way of those dragons, evil and trouble in general. Thadeous has spent his life watching his perfect older brother Fabious embark upon valiant journeys and win the hearts of his people. Tired of being passed over for adventure, adoration and the throne, he’s settled for a life of wizard’s weed, hard booze and easy maidens. But when Fabious’ bride-to-be, Belladonna, gets kidnapped by the evil wizard Leezar, the king gives his deadbeat son an ultimatum: Man up and help rescue her or get cut off. Half-assedly embarking upon his first quest, Thadeous joins Fabious to trek across the perilous outlands and free the princess. Joined by Isabel–an elusive warrior with a dangerous agenda of her own–the brothers must vanquish horrific creatures and traitorous knights before they can reach Belladonna. If Thadeous can find his inner hero, he can help his brother prevent the destruction of his land. Stay a slacker, and not only does he die a coward, he gets front row seats to the dawn of an all-new Dark Ages.

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Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Mulholland Drive / Mulholland Dr.

Cast: Justin Theroux, Laura Harring, Naomi Watts, Ann Miller, Dan Hedaya

Pandora couldn’t resist opening the forbidden box containing all the delusions of mankind, and let’s just say David Lynch, in Mulholland Drive, indulges a similar impulse. Employing a familiar film noir atmosphere to unravel, as he coyly puts it, “a love story in the city of dreams,” Lynch establishes a foreboding but playful narrative in the film’s first half before subsuming all of Los Angeles and its corrupt ambitions into his voyeuristic universe of desire. Identities exchange, amnesia proliferates, and nightmare visions are induced, but not before we’ve become enthralled by the film’s two main characters: the dazed and sullen femme fatale, Rita (Laura Elena Harring), and the pert blonde just-arrived from Ontario (played exquisitely by Naomi Watts) who decides to help Rita regain her memory. Triggered by a rapturous Spanish-language version of Roy Orbison’s “Crying,” Lynch’s best film since Blue Velvet splits glowingly into two equally compelling parts